We usually meet on the last Wednesday of each month and on the second Tuesday of every other month, at 9:30am by the village hall. Walks are not long or strenuous; 5 or 6 miles on average, each with a different leader. Come along to see the countryside in all its moods, sometimes bathed in sunshine, often with a shower or two, even perhaps with a carpet of snow!


Our walkers might pass stone-age remains, badger setts and tracks, and fascinating old farmhouses and cottages. They will certainly enjoy sweeping views over the Cheshire plain, Peak District panoramas of hills and dales, and gentler scenery by canals and parkland in Lyme, Alderley and Ladybrook.

You are guaranteed a friendly welcome when you join us.
Do come!

Group Leader David Burke

walking@highlaneu3a.org.uk

 

 

2019 Walk Programme 

Month

Day

Date

Leader(s)

January

Tuesday

Wednesday

8

30

Jeff Mortimer

Richard Hedley

February

Wednesday

27

Jeff Robinson

March

Wednesday

27

Mike/Sandra Moran

April

Tuesday

Wednesday

9

24

Shelagh Stokes

Ruth/Dave Smith

May

Tuesday

Wednesday

7

29

Sam/Irene Chappell

Walter/Freda Mason

June

Tuesday

Wednesday

11

26

Jeff Robinson

Steve/Ann Reynolds

July

Wednesday

31

Louanne/Peter Collins

August

Tuesday

Wednesday

13

28

Merlyn Young

Ron/Marje Rennell

September

Wednesday

25

Brian/Alison Allerton

October

Tuesday

Wednesday

8

30

Richard Hedley

Merlyn/Joyce Young

November Wednesday 27 Sam/Irene Chappell

December

Wednesday 18 David Burke


WALK REPORTS

 

Walk report – Tuesday 8th January

 

Unusually, today's walk started and ended at the Village Hall, with a pub lunch included. Jeff Mortimer led thirteen of us through High Lane village to pick up a footpath at the Woodside Tennis Club. We then walked by the primary school and recreation ground to cross the railway line and pick up the Goyt Way footpath. This took us by Elmerhurst Cottage and then along a track towards Platt Wood Farm. Here we took a climbing path to enter Lyme Park over a ladder stile. Crossing the west edge of Lyme Park revealed lovely views of Manchester and the Cheshire Plain. We left Lyme park at West Parkgate and then traversed some fields to pass near Keeper's Cottage and then on to Birchencliff, which is an unusual hamlet, now converted to holiday lets. After this we proceeded along Shrigley Road to pick up a path at Harrop Brow, passing Lockgate Farm and then on to Middlewood Way. At the site of the old Higher Poynton station some of us ate a packed lunch while most of us went to the nearby Boar's Head and enjoyed a pub lunch and some liquid refreshment.

 

After lunch it was simply a leisurely walk along the canal towing path to the Bull's Head in High Lane and then back to the Village Hall.

 

 

Jeff Mortimer

 

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Walk Report - Wednesday 30th January

 

There had been heavy snow overnight so only five of us turned up at the Village Hall car-park.

 

The walk was to be led by Rick Hedley who had planned to start and finish at Hague Bar car-park near New Mills. However as the road there was steep and winding and would probably be covered in ice, we decided to postpone that walk, and instead start and finish in High Lane.

 

Most of this walk was along the canal tow-paths. Initially along the Macclesfield Canal to Marple where we stopped for coffee and photos. We then followed the Peak Forest Canal south crossing a bridge to take a path through Stanleyhall Wood to pick up a track to Lea Cote Farm. Here we followed footpaths accross fields to Windlehurst Hall flats , then along a path adjacent to the canal to emerge at Andrew Lane where we again found the Macclesfield Canal tow-path. We did not however return to the car park, but continued under the A6 to the Bull's Head, where we enjoyed a welcome pub lunch and drinks.

 

 

Jeff Mortimer

 

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Walk Report -Wednesday walk 27th February

 

A beautiful day and an excellent turnout of 25 people.

 

We started the walk from the car park in Lyme park and made our way up to Bowstones Cottage where we paused to get our breath back and look at the bowstones. We then carried on along Gritstone Trail past the trig point on Sponds Hill to the view point where we stopped for coffee. After that, retraced our steps back to follow the park boundary downhill and cut across to Bakestone Moor. On route we passed by the capped off entrances to two disused coal mines.

 

A short climb took us to an obelisk depicting the information of the coal mines in the area. We stopped for lunch in glorious sunshine. We then made our way down to Keepers Cottage and on to the west gate of Lyme and from here back through the park to the car park.

 

An excellent day covering 7 miles.

 

 

 

Jeff Robinson

 

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Walk Report - Wednesday 27th March 2019      Foolow and Eyam, Derbyshire.

 

Mike and Sandra Moran led a group of 22 on a 6 mile amble in Derbyshire on a pleasant bright dry  day. We parked on the green by the duck pond in the lovely Derbyshire village of Foolow and followed field paths to the famous plague village of Eyam, where we enjoyed a coffee stop on the village green by the old stocks, everyone was on good behaviour so we had no use for them! Our onward route followed a bridle path and field paths which eventually circled round back to  Foolow village. Some of the group enjoyed a remarkably good quality/value lunch in the welcoming Bull's Head pub, well worth another visit.

 


David Burke 

 

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Walk report - Tuesday 9th April 2019. Marple, Compstall, Werneth Low, Etherlow Country Park

 

Nine of us set out on a beautiful sunny  but deceptively cold, spring morning from Brabyns Park in Marple. From the canal side we descended under the aqueduct and viaduct and then followed the River Etherow and some very, very muddy paths through the wood into Compstall. After a short coffee break we began the steady climb to the top of Werneth Low where we admired the views over Cheshire, Derbyshire, Lancashire and Yorkshire. Following a civilised lunch break at picnic tables we descended through fields and woods to Etherow Country Park where the weir and mandarin ducks offered ideal photography opportunites. The final stage of the walk was back through the centre of Brabyns Park to complete the circle. 

 

Shelagh Stokes.

 

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Walk report - Wednesday 24th April 2019        Sett Valley, Hayfield

 

19 folk met in Birch Vale for the 5 mile Mystery Walk. The group walked down the Sett Valley Trail via Bluebell Wood (with strong perfume from the blue bells) towards Hayfield where a coffee break was agreed,picnic benches available. Crossing the bypass into Hayfield behind the church over the river and diverting off road down the calico trail to School Field.  A little road walking, passing stone cottages (chatting to a lady in her garden with large black dog) and then upward until reaching the lower slope of Lantern Pike, with views of Little Hayfield and Kinder Scout.  Despite breathlessness everyone made the ascents. The group then veered off left away from the path leading to Rowarth for yet another ascent, on reaching the top with magnificent views, we sat down for lunch in a slight breeze and hazy sunshine.   Of course, downward was our next challenge with track, road (named Stitch Lane)and path - a steep decent to the Sycamore Pub and our parked cars.

 

 

Ruth Smith

 

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Walk report - Tuesday 7th May 2019

 

Sam and Irene Chappell led a small group of 9 walkers on a 5.5 mile walk from Bollington on a cloudy but pleasant day slightly warmer than the weather we had over the May Bank holiday. The walk started from the car park in the centre of Bollington and went along the canal towards Macclesfield for about a mile and a half passing some interesting canal side features and gardens. Our route took us away from the canal at Hurdsfield passing Jenny's farm and on to Higher Swanscoe Farm and Kerridge Road for a short distance before passing the entrance to Swanscoe Hall. The next section on field paths passed a number of farms and then on to Windmill Lane

 

There were two major items of interest to see along the Windmill Lane –Victoria Bridge and Clayton's tower.

 

Victoria Bridge crossed the inclined plane that marked the top of the  ‘Rally Road' . There were two tracks up the incline where trucks were hauled up empty and lowered down loaded with stone. A steam powered winding drum at the top provided the motive effort via cables. It is thought that there were tracks along some parts of the lane in order to bring stone from other quarries.

 

Clayton's Tower , beside  Windmill Lane , appears to have been a chimney top for a furnace lower down the hill, although inspection in 2009 showed no sign of soot. Neither is there a shaft beneath the tower so that it never served as a ventilation shaft for local coal mines.

 

From here the walk continued behind the cottages, through the gardens for our lunch stop with a view and across and into Kerridge. Passing through the village we then returned to Bollington and the car park.

 

Sam & Irene Chappell

 

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Walk Report: Wednesday 29th May 2019     Derbyshire Dales 

 

In late May, this 7 dales walk (Litton,Tansley, Cressbrook, Ravensdale, Water-cum-Jolly, Millers, and Tideswell Dales) was a visual delight. Wild flowers were in abundance - early purple orchids, cowslips, wild garlic, bluebells, rock roses, cuckoo flowers, stitchworts - and there was local interest from lambs being fed, from fly fishing, and from the ever varying scenery.

 

The thirteen walkers did have to tread carefully at times in the limestone paths of Tansley and Cressbrook Dales, but elsewhere the paths were flat and easy, and the threatened rain never materialised. 

 

By common consent the walk was diverted along Water-cum-Jolly Dale, rather than the Monsal Trail tunnels.

 

The 6 mile walk was particularly poignant for Ron Barrow, who was born in the cottage block which used to stand on what is now the Tideswell Dale car park. It was also good to welcome back our group leader David after a short period of absence.

 

 

Walter Mason


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U3A Walk: Tuesday 11th June 2019   Alderley Edge

 

Despite a not very good weather forecast but 10 brave people turned out for the walk round Alderley Edge. The walk started from the National Trust car park at the Wizard Alderley Edge.

 

In the rain we made our way up through the woods which gave us some shelter, eventually climbing slightly to pass the remains of the old copper mine. From here we carried on round to the Edge and a mud-stone rocky outcrop where we were exposed to the wind and rain, but still had reasonable good views.

 

The path then continued back through the shelter of the wood and past the site of the Armada Beacon before doubling back on itself and passing the Wizard's Well. We followed the path past the backs of large houses and made our way down Macclesfield road before taking another path to the left.

 

After a short coffee break under the shelter of a large tree we continued to Artists Lane and eventually crossing various fields to reach the cobbled track of Bradford Lane. The route continued over the fields on good paths in relatively dry conditions to cross Finlow wood and a short distance brought us past a very large mansion house back to the starting point.

 

A very good 5 mile walk, despite the weather.

 

 

Jeff Robinson

 

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Walk report - Malkins Bank 31st July

 

Our 6 mile walk took us along the canal and then through rolling farmland and pretty wooded valleys. This area once contained a thriving salt industry due to large underground deposits which, once extracted, were pan dried and then sent by train (the salt line) to the Potteries.

 

Nine of us met at the now defunct salt line carpark and set off along the Trent and Mersey canal (part of the Cheshire ring) with its unusual sets of twin locks built by Telford and Brindley. A steady stream of boats was going through the locks.

 

At Wheelock we left the canal where we had to make a slight detour as the recent heavy rain had left our original route waterlogged. However, we were soon able to get back on track at Sandbach mill and without getting too bogged down were able to complete the original route.

 

What we hadn't catered for was the freak weather conditions which had resulted in flooding, road closures and diversions in the Stockport area, both in the morning and on our way home. We hope those who braved the conditions thought the walk worthwhile!

 

Louanne Collins

 

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Walk report – Tuesday 13 th  August 2019  Hayfield /Little Hayfield Walk


Merlyn and Joyce led 16 walkers on a historical walk from Hayfield to Kinder Reservoir, the shooting cabin on Middle Moor returning via Park Hall and Little Hayfield.

 

We followed the route of the Kinder reservoir construction railway, up through the village along the river Sett. Old photos were circulated of the train route dating back to the reservoir construction from 1903 to 1912.

 

At the reservoir dam we stopped for coffee admiring the views of surrounding hills rich in purple heather. Joyce gave a historical summary of Upper House sited in woodland above the dam: and its former owner Sir James Watts a Manchester Textile merchant.

 

Refreshed we followed the reservoir path through muddy sections and high bracken to Williams Clough and then followed the gradual heather clad diagonal path up to Middle Moor. A red grouse scurried along the pathway in front maybe avoiding the shooting season!

 

Lunch was taken on a sheltered heather bank in sunshine on the moor overlooking views of Chinley Churn, Lantern Pike, and beyond. Walters's grandchildren who accompanied us on the walk finished lunch quickly and picked small bilberries in nearby cloughs.

 

Return was via Park Hall to see the recently cleared wall garden and then though Little Hayfield. We took a seldom used path following a tributary of the river Sett back to the village.

 

Merlyn Young

 

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Walk report - Winster and Stanton Moor


Eleven of us met in the public car park to the south of Winster for a roughly 6 mile walk up to and around Stanton Moor. Lead mining, probably dating back to Roman times, boomed in the 18th century with Winster becoming one of the largest towns in Derbyshire. Stanton Moor, a Scheduled Ancient Monument, is a mystical and isolated gritstone mass, covered with antiquarian sites and quarries. Our walk began in Winster with its fine architecture and steep quaintness, before climbing up to Stanton Moor and delving into its mystery and secrets of earlier times.

 

We set off from the car park across the common, immediately passing the capped off shaft of Wesson Mine, before descending to Main Street via one of the many jitties (narrow footpaths) past well kept gardens. Having noted in passing the Wesleyan Chapel, Bank House, Burton Institute, Dower House and Winster Hall we reached the Market House, where we turned left down Woodhouse lane onto a gently downhill path. At the bottom of the escarpment we began our 200m (700ft) or so ascent to the South East corner of Stanton Moor. The climb was moderate for the most part, but we paused for a coffee break and to turn and take in views back down to the valley bottom and up to Winster, before tackling the short, but steepest, 50m rise through a small scrub wooded area. Continuing the more moderate climb we passed through the camping and caravan park at Barn Farm to reach the lane running along the southern edge of Stanton Moor.

 

After a dry start the predicted rain arrived shortly before we made our way onto the Moor. Here we decamped to a wooded dell with a convenient flat rock outcrop for a welcome but damp lunch. Refreshed we set off along the eastern edge which falls away sharply exposing dramatic weathered gritstone shapes and views of Darley Dale and Matlock. We visited the first of the notable named rocks, the Cat (contraction of Cath meaning battle) with its enigmatic carving. This was followed by a look at the Reform Tower, erected in honour of Earl Grey's steering of the Reform Act. It is worth noting that the silver birch tree clumps dotted around the moor have only grown up over the last 50 years. During the early World War I period the coniferous plantations of larch, spruce and Scots pine, which then covered Stanton Moor, were systematically felled to produce trench timber for shipment to the battlefields of Europe. This was reportedly carried out by the First Royal Canadian Women's Forestry Corps. The moor contains numerous burial cairns and stone circles dating back 3500 to 4500 years, the majority of which are barely, if at all discernable under the covering of grass, heather and bracken. We inspected the only one feature remaining in something like its original form, the Nine Ladies Stone Circle. This 50ft diameter ring and solitary outlier, known as the King Stone is all that remains of a burial mound. The fanciful name is said to come from a much more recent legend of nine ladies who were turned to stone for dancing on the Sabbath, while their fiddler is now the lonely King Stone. Reflecting on the cremated remains of hundreds of people beneath, we descended gently southwards back down the centre of the moor with panoramic views to Youlgreave in the west, Winster and Matlock in front and Darley Dale to the east (albeit slightly marred by the now easing rain). Nearing the bottom of the moor we took the path sharply right to exit the moor below the numerous disused quarries that mark its western edge, passing another notable rock know locally as the Cork Stone for its resemblance to a champagne cork.

 

After a short walk down Birchover Road we reached the entrance to the one remaining working quarry, Stanton Park. Here we turned right and exited through the rear of the quarries car park into a wooded ridge running behind the village of Birchover. Following the gently descending path we emerged back onto the road at the other end of the village by the Druid Inn. Birchover, strung out along a main street has grown up over the last 300 years mainly to house workers from the nearby quarries. Taking the lane at the left of the inn we passed the small outcrop known as Rowter Rocks. As the name of the inn implies there are tales of ancient religious activities and magic being performed on this weathered and now tree covered outcrop. The real magic of this place is the work of The Rev. Thomas Eyre, who built the first chapel below the rocks. He carved seats and caves into the rocks where he spent much time entertaining friends and writing sermons. We continued down the lane to just beyond Rocking Stone Farm where we looped back along the top of the ridge, below Birchover and above Birchover Wood into Uppertown, a tiny hamlet on a quiet lane back to Winster. A few hundred metres down the road we took the path left through fields to the bottom of the valley and rejoined our outward route for the last half a mile up to Winster and back to the car park on East Bank.

 

It's hard to imagine that the quiet, rambling roads of Winster or the wild heather clad Stanton Moor have ever been touched by the hands of industry. What we saw on our walk today, though, is a reminder of how time can wear down and reclaim scarred landscapes.

 

Ron Rennell

 

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